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20121226
20130103
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
violence continues in chicago. tonight, the reverend jesse jackson on the city's grim milestone of 500 homicides in one year. and it's nearly 2013, but attitudes on race remain two centuries behind. >> the way i look at it, it's freedom of speech. >> the reverend marcia dyson, and the president of the national urban league on the fresh bigotry of supposed post-racial america. >>> with three days left before the start of the new year, it's put up or shut up time for congressional leaders. president obama addressed reporters from the white house this evening. roughly an hour after meeting with leaders of the house and senate. >> i still want to get this done. it's the right thing to do for our families, for our businesses, and for our entire economy. but the hour for immediate action is here. it is now. >> senate leaders harry reid and mitch mcconnell were back at the capitol in no time. mcconnell gathered his members to inform them of the work that needs to be done. >> we had a good meeting down at the white house. we are engaged in discussions, the majority leader and myself and the wh
parle, how are you? welcome. >> thanks. >> here we go. and dr. shirley ann jackson. and andrea mitchell. who's probably been working since fife this morning -- since five this morning too. >> how are you? >> i bet you every single person here has been up since five. >> i dressed based on what andrea had on. >> you saw her on tv, and then you said, oh -- that was clever. you're not a rhodes scholar for anything. [laughter] >> wow. >> 4:30 wakeup for morning joe. >> with oh, my gosh. so you get up at 4:30 every day -- >> not every day. >> many days. >> what time do you get up, shirley? >> 4:30 to 5. >> i'm the late riser, 5 to 5:30. >> and then you work, how late do you work straight through? typically. i guess every day is different. >> when you're doing the today program, you have to be there, the last one out at night. especially secretary clinton is traveling right now, so there were late developments and early developments as well. so i'm there til 10 or 11. >> wow. >> and, you know, i can go out and get something to eat and come back. >> so for the two people in america that don't know a
and pays taxes, it would cost them about $3,000 a year. you don't get anything for it. lisa jackson has been for a long period of time the head of the epa, obama's epa. i asked her the question live on tv. i said, if we were going to pass this cap and trade, would this lower our co2 emissions worldwide? she said no it wouldn't. the reason it wouldn't she said is this only applies to the united states. this isn't where the problem s. the problem is in china, in mexico, in other countries where they don't have standards. that is the crown jewel of all regulations. it is the most expensive one. and it is one that is based on the assumption that the catastrophic global warming is taking place, and it is due to man made gases. the people of this country know better. >> you know, senator, to be able to do that, it would be an outrage to most of us who understand the legislative process and we even have the ept representatives. we would just be ignoring the constitutional responsibility to get authorization. how can he do this? >> that's right. first of all, it is kind of technical, but they t
, not me, not 350. >> since you raised keystone xl, do you think the announcement by lisa jackson of her retirement or resignation from the environmental protection agency is partly due to her opposition to moving forward with the keystone xl? >> i don't know. this keystone thing for me has been sort of crazy from the beginning. the 20th most important, scientists in the world road the president a letter saying this is not in the country's national interest. our most important climatologist said, if you burn all that tar sands oil on top of everything else being burned, it is game over for the climate. we of indigenous people from one end of the content to the other powerfully in this vital no more movement pointing out tar sands is a perfect example of exploitation and for hundreds of years. there is no reason to do this except that it helps rich oil men. for the life of me i cannot understand why it has been so hard to block it. we have done everything we can think of. we were able to delay it for your with the largest civil disobedience action in 30 years in this country. let's hope w
and some of the statements that he has taken. >> meanwhile, epa administer lisa jackson's decision to step down also has many doubting whether the president will be able to get her replacement confirmed by congress. seems like there's not much love in congress now, period. we're going to go all the way to the left this time. this is insane at this point, right? every time the president not even nominates someone, but even mentions their name in connection with the connection of nomination to any cabinet post, can you reflexively expect republicans to say, no, no, no, that person is no good. >> republicans wanted to win with susan rice, and they got a win. they're hoping to do the same thing with chuck hagel. >> the president apoints cabinet members, and the senate is expected to allow that to happen. they're not supposed to stand in the way every time there's some sort of minor idealogical qualm with them, right? >> exactly. >> with susan rice, you know, it was tied to the benghazi scandal, which they had spent months making a big deal, and obviously that was important to them. with chuck
to my left you have beautiful jackson square. to my right, the mighty mississippi river, blue skies here. it is picture perfect for what will be a huge, huge celebration. so i'm sitting atop jack's brewery right now, just behind me this is what you'll see on tv tonight, we'll be coming to you live for midnight, both eastern and central time, you get the fleur-de-lis drop, baby new year which i don't even know how to describe this, if you don't know in new orleans, it is the amazing tradition, found this baby floating post katrina, it is part of the celebration. imagine, deb, you have new orleans which i'm sure you've been here, it is crazy and you don't sleep and you party all night anyway. take that, add new year's eve, add the sugar bowl, and you have probably -- they're estimating some 50,000 people. just quickly, i'll be down here in the french quarter, with, you know, the rest of the crew, and different parts of the country, ringing in the new year with kathy and anderson. i won't be ready to go to bed. i'm going to keep the party moving and grooving until midnight central time. so
man by the name of jimmy lee jackson tried to protect his mother, shot in the stomach by a state trooper in a few days later he died at a local hospital. because of what happened to have, we decided to march from selma to montgomery. so march 7, in 1865, about this time of day, 600 of us have participated in a non-pilot workshop. we ran up to a 50 miles and selma to montgomery, to dramatize the nation and wrote the people of of color in alabama wanted to register to vote. during those days, i had all of my hair and a few pounds lighter. i was wearing a bat pack before it became fashionable to wear but tax. and they missed that part i had two books. i thought it was going to be arrested, go to jail, so wanted to have some thing to read. i had an apple and i had an orange. one apple and one orange. i wanted to do something to eat. i thought it was going to be in jail with my friends, my colleagues and neighbors. i wanted to be able to brush my teeth. as we were crossing the alabama river, my colleague walking beside me, a young man by the name of josÉ williams said to me, john, ca
. an incident occurred. a young man or the name of jamel jackson tried to protect his mother by a state trooper in a few days later he died at a local hospital and selma. because of what happened to him, we decided to march from selma to montgomery. since sunday, march 7, 1965 to about this time of day, 600 of us participated in nonviolent workshop. we line up in twos to a 50 master and selma to montgomery, to dramatize to the nation into the world that people of color in alabama once you're registered to vote. during those days, i had all of my hair and a few pounds lighter. i was wearing a back pack that became fashionable to wear back packs. and this backpack i had to boot. i thought i was going to be arrested, go to jail, so i wanted to have some thing to read. i had an apple and i had an orange. one apple and one orange. i wanted to have something to eat. i had to face into spanish. i was going to be in jail with my friends, colleagues and neighbors. i wanted to be with depression and teeth. as we were crossing the alabama river, my colleague walking beside me, a young man by the name of j
jackson dealing with food and hunger. i want to ask you as you look through some of these figures what surprised you the most? what did you learn? guest: well, thanks for having me. just to talk about some of our main findings our statistics are based on food calendar year 2011 and that's base tond food survey conducted in 2011. we found that about 14.9% households were food insecure. food insecure means they lack consistent food. food insecurity rate in the u.s. is around 14% to 15% since 2008. from 2007 to 2008 food insecurity increased with the resession. it was at 11% prior to the recession. >> let me go to this sub head linebacker here. the 15% of these households being food insecure means they have trouble putting adequate food on the table. the question is why? why do we have hunger in america even in today's day and age? >> we have a number of programs that target at food insecurity but we have very high poverty rates in the country, high levels of unemployment and this contributes to the levels of food insecurity. host: one of the issues that the first lady has been pushing fo
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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